BLOG

By Kelly Hanson 13 Dec, 2017
Wassily Kandinsky (1886-1944) was born in Moscow, Russia and learned how to play music on the cello and piano at an early age. Kandinsky traveled to places all over Europe such as Germany and France to study the works and art styles of other artists. He painted “Winter Landscape” in 1909 right before he began to work in abstract art. “Winter Landscape” is a post-impressionism style of artwork.

To make this inspired artwork you'll need the following supplies:
• Heavy-weight, light pink colored sulphite paper
• Black oil pastel
• Tempera paints
• Paintbrush

First, orient your paper in a landscape position. Draw a horizon line in the middle of the paper. Draw a small square on top of the horizon line. Draw a small triangle on top of the square. Draw horizontal, parallel lines to extend the roofline house. Draw hills and mountains on the top of the horizon line next to the little house. Add little detail (if desired) like the tree line on the left hill shown. Draw a curved path that begins narrow at the little house and widens toward the bottom of the page. Using powdered white tempera paint mix to paint an undercoat on the sky and snow bank areas as shown. Paint the snow banks, house, and sky using small, short brush strokes of multiple colors. Dip your brush into the white paint between each color you use. This will mix a little white with every color. (Save the black paint for the next step.) Use the black tempera paint on the hills and tree line last. Add short strokes of color to mix in. After painting, the original oil drawing lines will have a little paint covering them up. As a final step, retrace all black oil lines.


By Kelly Hanson 04 Dec, 2017
Art-play is a term used to describe an open-ended, process oriented art experiences. There is a difference between process art and project art. Project art provides instruction and encourages a controlled result. Process art encourages creative thinking and exploration without the pressure of “make yours look like mine”.

Art-play does not mean that you just present art materials to your child and wait to see what they do with them. Young children still need demonstration and encouragement so that they understand what to do and how to do it. The biggest difference is that you are not controlling the outcome of their work but more so allowing them to exercise their fine motor skills in supervised play. The process of art-play is valued more than the result of their art work.

I have been amazed at some of the ideas I have seen come from a three year old when they are not restricted by technical directions. As an art educator and a kindergarten teacher, I believe there is great value in both philosophies!

So relax a little, get messy, and enjoy the process. It's the memories we make with our children that count the most.
By Kelly Hanson 13 Dec, 2017
Wassily Kandinsky (1886-1944) was born in Moscow, Russia and learned how to play music on the cello and piano at an early age. Kandinsky traveled to places all over Europe such as Germany and France to study the works and art styles of other artists. He painted “Winter Landscape” in 1909 right before he began to work in abstract art. “Winter Landscape” is a post-impressionism style of artwork.

To make this inspired artwork you'll need the following supplies:
• Heavy-weight, light pink colored sulphite paper
• Black oil pastel
• Tempera paints
• Paintbrush

First, orient your paper in a landscape position. Draw a horizon line in the middle of the paper. Draw a small square on top of the horizon line. Draw a small triangle on top of the square. Draw horizontal, parallel lines to extend the roofline house. Draw hills and mountains on the top of the horizon line next to the little house. Add little detail (if desired) like the tree line on the left hill shown. Draw a curved path that begins narrow at the little house and widens toward the bottom of the page. Using powdered white tempera paint mix to paint an undercoat on the sky and snow bank areas as shown. Paint the snow banks, house, and sky using small, short brush strokes of multiple colors. Dip your brush into the white paint between each color you use. This will mix a little white with every color. (Save the black paint for the next step.) Use the black tempera paint on the hills and tree line last. Add short strokes of color to mix in. After painting, the original oil drawing lines will have a little paint covering them up. As a final step, retrace all black oil lines.


By Kelly Hanson 04 Dec, 2017
Art-play is a term used to describe an open-ended, process oriented art experiences. There is a difference between process art and project art. Project art provides instruction and encourages a controlled result. Process art encourages creative thinking and exploration without the pressure of “make yours look like mine”.

Art-play does not mean that you just present art materials to your child and wait to see what they do with them. Young children still need demonstration and encouragement so that they understand what to do and how to do it. The biggest difference is that you are not controlling the outcome of their work but more so allowing them to exercise their fine motor skills in supervised play. The process of art-play is valued more than the result of their art work.

I have been amazed at some of the ideas I have seen come from a three year old when they are not restricted by technical directions. As an art educator and a kindergarten teacher, I believe there is great value in both philosophies!

So relax a little, get messy, and enjoy the process. It's the memories we make with our children that count the most.
Share by: